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TRAFFIC ALERT

Starting Nov. 1, the northbound I-35 Ewing Ave. / Marsalis Ave. exit ramp that typically brings you to the Dallas Zoo will be RELOCATED, which may affect your route to the Zoo. Click here for more information.

Tigers

Tigers

Habitat

Tropical forests, evergreen forests, grasslands, rocky terrain

Conservation Status

Endangered

Grrrreeeat Tiger Facts

Each tiger has a unique stripe pattern. No two individuals have the same one.

Sumatran tigers have more hair around their heads than the other types of tigers, giving them a more bearded or maned appearance. They are also the smallest and rarest subspecies of tiger.

Tigers are one of the few cats that actually like water. They even have partially webbed toes.

A tiger’s night vision is six times more acute than a human’s!

Challenges in the Wild

Climate change & human/wildlife conflict: As sea levels rise due to climate change, some tiger species are being forced to move into more heavily human populated areas, increasing their contact with humans.

Palm oil harvesting: Tigers continue to lose their habitat as the demand for palm-oil and paper products increases.

Illegal wildlife trade: Tiger pelts are considered a status symbol, and other body parts are used in traditional Asian medicines. Demand for these items fuels the illegal wildlife trade.


Dallas Zoo Saving Tigers


The Dallas Zoo has partnered with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) to protect 100,000 acres of forest habitat in Sumatra, which benefits Sumatran tigers. The Thirty Hills project restores deforested areas of the land and sets aside some land for local communities to generate income. This project is part of the WWF’s initiative to double the number of wild tigers by 2022.

You Can Save Tigers in the Wild

Buy a Dallas Zoo membership to help save tigers in the wild.

Purchase paper and palm-oil products certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) to ensure they are sustainably sourced.

Choose “tiger-safe” ice cream, like Ben & Jerry’s.